Japan is building the World’s largest floating solar power plant





Japan doesn't have much land to spare. Tokyo Leasing Corporation along with Kyocera Corporation have announced a project to built the World’s Largest Floating Solar Plant.

 The 13.7 megawatt (MW) floating solar power plant will be built on the Yamakura Dam reservoir. Kyocera had earlier announced building a similar 7.5 MW solar power plant on Umenokifurukori reservoir in Japan.

51,000 Kyocera solar modules will be installed in the waters of the Yamakura Dam reservoir which is an 180,000 square meter area. The project is expected to generate an estimated 16,170 MWh of electricity per year, enough to power up 4,700 typical households.

Only three countries in the world-Japan, India, and Australia have built floating Solar Plant so far.

  The Yamakura Dam project is set to complete by March 2018. Kyocera has built four floating solar power plant in Japan so far since 2014. The company plans to sell the electricity generated from this solar farms to the Tokyo Electric Power Company.

Floating solar plant are actually very beneficial. Solar panels in water perform better than that of the land. Algae growth in water can be slowed down by the solar panels which stop sunlight from hitting the water.

Japan is building the World’s largest floating solar power plant Japan is building the World’s largest floating solar power plant Reviewed by Mark Wilson on 10:04 AM Rating: 5

17 comments

  1. Great idea. The productivity of static structures increases and decreased degradation of its' integrity (reduction of algae) in one move is brilliant design. We'll need more innovation like this now and as the future comes.

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    1. And there's maybe a second benefit from reduced light hitting the water besides reduction of algae, reduced water evaporation.

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  2. Anyone know on what platform they will float?

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    1. I hope they make the floaters from recovered and recycled plastic, then it will be a totally green project

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  3. I wonder, with the reduction in algae, what kind of ecosystem will live under them.

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  4. I live in the U.S and I just coincidentally read in my paper my electric company built one so this article is wrong to say only those 3 countries have built them.

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  5. Wow, this is gonna be "GREAT" for the oxygenation of the earth, if catches. Considering more than 90% of the oxygen we have comes out the waters... yeah. Let's now destroy that too, and call it great!

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    1. Actually, the figure is more like ~70% of the world's oxygen. Coincidentally, the earth's surface is ~71% water... but please, go on with the self-righteous pseudoscience.

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  6. None of the commenters seem to be too bothered by increased corrosion or maintenance costs. Does anyone have insight on this topic?

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  7. Would ocean storms make this undoable there?

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    1. It's a reservoir, inland, so ocean storms would be a non-factor.

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  8. Replies
    1. It's a reservoir... Not a recreational lake

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